This website collects a number of cookies from its users for improving your overall experience of the site.

Research School Network: Self-Regulation at a Distance – Modelling Metacognition in Geography Continuing our exploration of self-regulation at a distance, here’s Ben Crockett modelling his metacognitive thinking.


Self-Regulation at a Distance – Modelling Metacognition in Geography

Continuing our exploration of self-regulation at a distance, here’s Ben Crockett modelling his metacognitive thinking.

Last week, the Durrington Research School Team posted three video blogs on developing self-regulation during distance teaching:

Self-Regulation at a Distance – an Introduction – By Chris Runeckles

Self-Regulation at a Distance – Supporting Students – By Marc Rowland

Self-Regulation at a Distance – Helping Teachers to Help Students – by Shaun Allison

To develop this, we plan to share examples of teachers implementing this within their specific subject/​phase. First up was Research School Associate and Deputy Leader of PE James Crane in this video. Today Research School Associate and Director of Geography Ben Crockett shares how he uses video to model his metacognitive thought processes when he is approaching a certain type of question.

Ben describes the process:

Initially I break down the question by command word, other important aspects of the question and the amount of marks available. I then go beyond this by introducing some basic phrases I could use to help me develop my answer around the expectations of the question, such as in the figure” and as a result of”.

Following this I move on to retrieving my prior learning/​knowledge so that I have a basic list of what I know related to the question topic. I do this without looking at the figure and then I look at what I know and compare this to the figure, to identify similarities/​places where I could link the two.

Using this I then create a checklist of things I want to include in my answer, including: the figure, specific vocabulary (in this case species names), explanation terms etc. I then use this to monitor and check my progress through the answer, as shown by the bits highlighted in the model answer.

Here’s the video:

Account for the changes in vegetation in a sand du

More from the Durrington Research School

Show all news